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Nottingham

Location

Gb Map

OS Ref: SK 570 395

Last Visited: 2013


From what I saw of Nottingham on our brief visit to the City of Caves and Galleries of Justice, I must admit I was rather impressed.

It seemed to be a city where the term 'Civic Pride' was not entirely dead despite any misgivings about the councillors.

Between visiting the above attractions we had lunch in Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem, which is partly built in caves and claims to be the oldest inn in England. Very good it was too.

City of Caves

Location

Nottinghamshire Map

OS Ref: SK 574 396

Last Visited: 2013

The Tannery

The Tannery

Somewhat confusingly, the entrance to the City of Caves is on the upper floor of the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre.

It is part of a complex of over 500 caves under Nottingham which date back to the Dark Ages. The city of has more man-made caves than anywhere else in Britain as the soft Sherwood Sandstone allowed hand-carved cellars to be excavated and used as store rooms, factories, pub cellars, dwellings and even a tannery that was in use from 1500–1640.

Later during the Second World War the caves were used as air raid shelters.

For opening times, admission prices, etc. please see the official site detailed below.

External Links and References

  • External Links

    • City of Caves
      The official site with lots more information on the caves, as well as opening times, admission prices, special events, etc.
      http://www.cityofcaves.com/

Galleries of Justice

Location

Nottinghamshire Map

OS Ref: SK 575 396

Last Visited: 2013

The Prison Yard

The Prison Yard

The Galleries of Justice is a museum based in Nottingham’s old courthouse and gaol; a museum or is that a theatre? They a very keen on actor led tours.

Whilst there is written evidence of a court on this site since at least 1375 and a prison from at least 1449, the current buildings date from 1770, with later nineteenth century additions.

The gaol closed in 1878, but the building continued to house Nottingham’s criminal and civil courts until 1985.

In 1993 the Lace Market Heritage Trust took over the building and opened The Galleries of Justice Museum.

For opening times, admission prices, etc. please see the official site detailed below.

External Links and References