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Ardgroom (Dhá Dhrom)

Location

Cork Map

OS Ref: V 688 552

Last Visited: 2010


Travelling west along the coast road from Kenmare, Ardgroom is the first substantial village you come to. It has a village shop, Harringtonʼs, which not only stocks some interesting craft and whole-food produce, also doubles up as an internet cafe, a post office and a petrol filling station.

The village inn, called The Village Inn, does bar meals and has a restaurant. The bar meals are OK, but I cannot speak for the restaurant as it was closed on the night we visited.

Ardgroom Stone Circle

Location

Cork Map

OS Ref: V 708 554

Last Visited: 2010

Location, location, location. This beautifully situated property enjoys stunning views over the Kenmare River towards Macgillycuddys Reeks and the Ring of Kerry. It stands on dry ground although the surrounding land is in need of drainage.

Requiring complete renovation, the property is currently little more than a few standing stones, it could provide interesting round house accommodation for a couple or small family.

Glenbeg Lough

Location

Cork Map

OS Ref: V 700 538

Last Visited: 2010

Lough Glenbeg

Lough Glenbeg

Lough Glenbeg

Lough Glenbeg

Whilst there is a road running along the eastern shore of Glenbeg Lough giving access to the properties at the head of the lake, the most spectacular views are from the northern end.

Hill climbing, walking and fishing are all available in the area.

Pallas Quay

Location

Cork Map

OS Ref: V 701 575

Last Visited: 2010

Collarus from Pallas

Collarus from Pallas

Pallas Quay is protected by a chain of rocky islets joined by a causeway. Not that it needs much protection tucked away up the Kenmare River behind the Kilcatherine Peninsula.

It is mainly used by the mussel boats, that can regularly be seen working up and down the lines of blue buoys, which are strung across the bay. A rope hangs down from each buoy on which the mussels grow.